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Question – Cords and How to Identify the Individual Wires – Part 1

I think a hardware store employee gave me wrong advice about cords. One side is smooth, one is ridged; which is which?

Regarding an electric cord that is all one color: Covering on wire is smooth on one side, and ridged on the other side…. Is the “ridged” side the HOT and the “smooth” side the NEUTRAL ??? IF true then it would also mean “ridged” side would go to the brass screw and “smooth” side of the wire to the silver screw on a plug ??

Let’s solve the Cord Mystery:
The smooth side is for hot and this attaches to the brass screw and the ridge side is for neutral which attaches to the silver screw.

If the cord has three wires, or if the two prongs are keyed, that is one bigger than the other, then you can do a quick check by looking at the receptacle and you’ll notice that the smaller blade is for the hot which is the brass side, and – well you get the rest.

Don’t ever plug in a cord that is not connected to anything – that’s dangerous!

Cords & How to Identify the Individual Wires – Part 2

Cords & How to Identify the Individual Wires – Part 3


« Question – Cords and How to Identify the Individual Wires – Part 2 Question – Dimmer Switches – Part 1 »
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